ITU

Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers

Research output: Contribution to conference - NOT published in proceeding or journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers. / Batista Narcizo, Fabricio; Ahmed, Zaheer; Hansen, Dan Witzner.

2017. Abstract from 19th European Conference on Eye Movements, Wuppertal, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conference - NOT published in proceeding or journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Batista Narcizo, F, Ahmed, Z & Hansen, DW 2017, 'Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers' 19th European Conference on Eye Movements, Wuppertal, Germany, 20/08/2017 - 24/08/2017, .

APA

Batista Narcizo, F., Ahmed, Z., & Hansen, D. W. (2017). Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers. Abstract from 19th European Conference on Eye Movements, Wuppertal, Germany.

Vancouver

Batista Narcizo F, Ahmed Z, Hansen DW. Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers. 2017. Abstract from 19th European Conference on Eye Movements, Wuppertal, Germany.

Author

Bibtex

@conference{03d765114d2f49d5bc78b96ae887ed24,
title = "Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers",
abstract = "The use of additional information (a.k.a. priors) to help the eye tracking process is presented as an alternative to compensate classical geometrical problems in head-mounted eye trackers. Priors can be obtained from several distinct sources, such as: sensors to collect information related to distance, location, luminance, movement, speed; information extracted directly from the scene camera; calibration of video capture devices and other components of the eye tracker; information collected from a totally controlled environment; among others. Thus, priors are used to improve the robustness of eye tracking in real applications, for example, (1) If the distance between the subject and the viewed target is known, it is possible to estimate subject’s current point of regard even when target moves in depth and suffers influence of parallax error; and (2) if the tridimensional angular rotation is known, it is possible to compensate the error induced by the head rotations using linear regression. Experiments with simulated eye tracking data and in real scenarios of elite sports have been showing that the use of priors to support the eye tracking systems help produce more accurate and precise gaze estimation specially for uncalibrated head-mounted setups.",
author = "{Batista Narcizo}, Fabricio and Zaheer Ahmed and Hansen, {Dan Witzner}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "23",
language = "English",
note = "19th European Conference on Eye Movements, ECEM ; Conference date: 20-08-2017 Through 24-08-2017",
url = "http://ecem2017.uni-wuppertal.de",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Using Priors to Compensate Geometrical Problems in Head-Mounted Eye Trackers

AU - Batista Narcizo, Fabricio

AU - Ahmed, Zaheer

AU - Hansen, Dan Witzner

PY - 2017/8/23

Y1 - 2017/8/23

N2 - The use of additional information (a.k.a. priors) to help the eye tracking process is presented as an alternative to compensate classical geometrical problems in head-mounted eye trackers. Priors can be obtained from several distinct sources, such as: sensors to collect information related to distance, location, luminance, movement, speed; information extracted directly from the scene camera; calibration of video capture devices and other components of the eye tracker; information collected from a totally controlled environment; among others. Thus, priors are used to improve the robustness of eye tracking in real applications, for example, (1) If the distance between the subject and the viewed target is known, it is possible to estimate subject’s current point of regard even when target moves in depth and suffers influence of parallax error; and (2) if the tridimensional angular rotation is known, it is possible to compensate the error induced by the head rotations using linear regression. Experiments with simulated eye tracking data and in real scenarios of elite sports have been showing that the use of priors to support the eye tracking systems help produce more accurate and precise gaze estimation specially for uncalibrated head-mounted setups.

AB - The use of additional information (a.k.a. priors) to help the eye tracking process is presented as an alternative to compensate classical geometrical problems in head-mounted eye trackers. Priors can be obtained from several distinct sources, such as: sensors to collect information related to distance, location, luminance, movement, speed; information extracted directly from the scene camera; calibration of video capture devices and other components of the eye tracker; information collected from a totally controlled environment; among others. Thus, priors are used to improve the robustness of eye tracking in real applications, for example, (1) If the distance between the subject and the viewed target is known, it is possible to estimate subject’s current point of regard even when target moves in depth and suffers influence of parallax error; and (2) if the tridimensional angular rotation is known, it is possible to compensate the error induced by the head rotations using linear regression. Experiments with simulated eye tracking data and in real scenarios of elite sports have been showing that the use of priors to support the eye tracking systems help produce more accurate and precise gaze estimation specially for uncalibrated head-mounted setups.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

ID: 82128232