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The Fly Printer - Extended

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The Fly Printer - Extended. / Beloff, Laura; Klaus, Malena.

2016.

Research output: Contribution to conference - NOT published in proceeding or journalConference abstract for conferenceResearchpeer-review

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@conference{bd80ba99abf441a6b4debaab6b593991,
title = "The Fly Printer - Extended",
abstract = "Artist talk / Work-in-progressWhat is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, likethe Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that producesimages that have no meaning, no instrumentality,that depict nothing in the world? The biological andthe cultural are reunited in this apparatus as apossibility to break through a common way ofdepicting the world, trying to find different surfacesand using strange apparatus to insist in the intersticeof visibility. The Fly Printer is a printing apparatusin a form of a closed environment that contains aflock of fruit flies. The flies eat special food that isprepared for them that is mixed with laser jet printerinks. The flies digest the food and gradually printdifferent color dots onto the paper that is placedunder the fly habitat. In the Fly Printer biologicalorganisms are used for replacing a standard part ofour common printer technology. The work points toa divide between the engineered and the organicand shows a human aspiration for control ofinformation and of biological species. Frustratingly,the work does not allow control over the flies andthe printing surface; the flies decide whether it issuitable to print on the paper or on the glass sphere.In other words the prints produced with this deviceare uncontrollable, they are random traces ofbiological processes.The most recent version of the Fly Printer,currently in progress, incorporates a technologicalvision (a camera) and neural network learningsoftware (DNNs). The purpose of the set-up is tojuxtapose a human perception with a technologicalperception through a system that incorporates livingorganisms (flies, and human-observers) andevolving technology (DNNs). The technologicalsystem also addresses an over-interpretationproblem present in the DNNs; evolved images,which are unrecognizable to humans, areinterpreted with over 99% certainty by the DNNs tobe familiar objects. The work ironically plays onthe over-interpretation of the technological systemand points to how human abilities are consideredthe point of reference in technologicaldevelopments.The Fly Printer is an artistic experiment that testsout a situation where human agency is playing inthe background, as the developer of technology, butwhen standing concretely beside the work the onlything a human can do is to observe the livingorganisms producing the dots and technologyindependently interpreting the results.The extended version of the Fly Printer containingthe technological perception and DNNs is acollaboration between Laura Beloff and MaleneTheres Klaus",
author = "Laura Beloff and Malena Klaus",
year = "2016",
month = may
language = "English",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - The Fly Printer - Extended

AU - Beloff, Laura

AU - Klaus, Malena

PY - 2016/5

Y1 - 2016/5

N2 - Artist talk / Work-in-progressWhat is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, likethe Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that producesimages that have no meaning, no instrumentality,that depict nothing in the world? The biological andthe cultural are reunited in this apparatus as apossibility to break through a common way ofdepicting the world, trying to find different surfacesand using strange apparatus to insist in the intersticeof visibility. The Fly Printer is a printing apparatusin a form of a closed environment that contains aflock of fruit flies. The flies eat special food that isprepared for them that is mixed with laser jet printerinks. The flies digest the food and gradually printdifferent color dots onto the paper that is placedunder the fly habitat. In the Fly Printer biologicalorganisms are used for replacing a standard part ofour common printer technology. The work points toa divide between the engineered and the organicand shows a human aspiration for control ofinformation and of biological species. Frustratingly,the work does not allow control over the flies andthe printing surface; the flies decide whether it issuitable to print on the paper or on the glass sphere.In other words the prints produced with this deviceare uncontrollable, they are random traces ofbiological processes.The most recent version of the Fly Printer,currently in progress, incorporates a technologicalvision (a camera) and neural network learningsoftware (DNNs). The purpose of the set-up is tojuxtapose a human perception with a technologicalperception through a system that incorporates livingorganisms (flies, and human-observers) andevolving technology (DNNs). The technologicalsystem also addresses an over-interpretationproblem present in the DNNs; evolved images,which are unrecognizable to humans, areinterpreted with over 99% certainty by the DNNs tobe familiar objects. The work ironically plays onthe over-interpretation of the technological systemand points to how human abilities are consideredthe point of reference in technologicaldevelopments.The Fly Printer is an artistic experiment that testsout a situation where human agency is playing inthe background, as the developer of technology, butwhen standing concretely beside the work the onlything a human can do is to observe the livingorganisms producing the dots and technologyindependently interpreting the results.The extended version of the Fly Printer containingthe technological perception and DNNs is acollaboration between Laura Beloff and MaleneTheres Klaus

AB - Artist talk / Work-in-progressWhat is the purpose of a machine or an artifact, likethe Fly Printer, that is dislocated, that producesimages that have no meaning, no instrumentality,that depict nothing in the world? The biological andthe cultural are reunited in this apparatus as apossibility to break through a common way ofdepicting the world, trying to find different surfacesand using strange apparatus to insist in the intersticeof visibility. The Fly Printer is a printing apparatusin a form of a closed environment that contains aflock of fruit flies. The flies eat special food that isprepared for them that is mixed with laser jet printerinks. The flies digest the food and gradually printdifferent color dots onto the paper that is placedunder the fly habitat. In the Fly Printer biologicalorganisms are used for replacing a standard part ofour common printer technology. The work points toa divide between the engineered and the organicand shows a human aspiration for control ofinformation and of biological species. Frustratingly,the work does not allow control over the flies andthe printing surface; the flies decide whether it issuitable to print on the paper or on the glass sphere.In other words the prints produced with this deviceare uncontrollable, they are random traces ofbiological processes.The most recent version of the Fly Printer,currently in progress, incorporates a technologicalvision (a camera) and neural network learningsoftware (DNNs). The purpose of the set-up is tojuxtapose a human perception with a technologicalperception through a system that incorporates livingorganisms (flies, and human-observers) andevolving technology (DNNs). The technologicalsystem also addresses an over-interpretationproblem present in the DNNs; evolved images,which are unrecognizable to humans, areinterpreted with over 99% certainty by the DNNs tobe familiar objects. The work ironically plays onthe over-interpretation of the technological systemand points to how human abilities are consideredthe point of reference in technologicaldevelopments.The Fly Printer is an artistic experiment that testsout a situation where human agency is playing inthe background, as the developer of technology, butwhen standing concretely beside the work the onlything a human can do is to observe the livingorganisms producing the dots and technologyindependently interpreting the results.The extended version of the Fly Printer containingthe technological perception and DNNs is acollaboration between Laura Beloff and MaleneTheres Klaus

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

ID: 80995495