ITU

Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking

Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Standard

Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking. / Homewood, Sarah; Karlsson, Amanda; Vallgårda, Anna.

DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference. Association for Computing Machinery, 2020. p. 1779–1791.

Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Homewood, S, Karlsson, A & Vallgårda, A 2020, Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking. in DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference. Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 1779–1791. https://doi.org/10.1145/3357236.3395425

APA

Homewood, S., Karlsson, A., & Vallgårda, A. (2020). Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking. In DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (pp. 1779–1791). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3357236.3395425

Vancouver

Homewood S, Karlsson A, Vallgårda A. Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking. In DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference. Association for Computing Machinery. 2020. p. 1779–1791 https://doi.org/10.1145/3357236.3395425

Author

Homewood, Sarah ; Karlsson, Amanda ; Vallgårda, Anna. / Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking. DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference. Association for Computing Machinery, 2020. pp. 1779–1791

Bibtex

@inproceedings{ef02be36c9a64ce7ac28268ea0c9fa63,
title = "Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking",
abstract = "This paper offers first-steps guidance towards the development of a methodology that embodies theoretical proposals for a fourth-wave, 'entanglement' approach to HCI. We propose the removal of technologies and the documenting of their absence as a method. Removal disrupts habitual relationships with our everyday technologies, revealing otherwise hidden knowledges. Removal as a method exemplifies that {"}you don't know what you've got till it's gone{"}. We apply removal to the case of menstrual cycle tracking in two ways: literally through two autoethnographies, and hypothetically through semi-structured interviews. We show how this method especially facilitates emotional, embodied and cultural knowledge of the lived experience of self-tracking and we unpack some opportunities, implications and limitations in its use. Finally, we present how this method might be adopted by others and propose cases in which removal as a method might be applicable to study of a wider range of technologies beyond self-tracking.",
author = "Sarah Homewood and Amanda Karlsson and Anna Vallg{\aa}rda",
year = "2020",
month = jul
day = "3",
doi = "10.1145/3357236.3395425",
language = "English",
pages = "1779–1791",
booktitle = "DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",
address = "United States",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Removal as a Method: A Fourth Wave HCI Approach to Understanding the Experience of Self-Tracking

AU - Homewood, Sarah

AU - Karlsson, Amanda

AU - Vallgårda, Anna

PY - 2020/7/3

Y1 - 2020/7/3

N2 - This paper offers first-steps guidance towards the development of a methodology that embodies theoretical proposals for a fourth-wave, 'entanglement' approach to HCI. We propose the removal of technologies and the documenting of their absence as a method. Removal disrupts habitual relationships with our everyday technologies, revealing otherwise hidden knowledges. Removal as a method exemplifies that "you don't know what you've got till it's gone". We apply removal to the case of menstrual cycle tracking in two ways: literally through two autoethnographies, and hypothetically through semi-structured interviews. We show how this method especially facilitates emotional, embodied and cultural knowledge of the lived experience of self-tracking and we unpack some opportunities, implications and limitations in its use. Finally, we present how this method might be adopted by others and propose cases in which removal as a method might be applicable to study of a wider range of technologies beyond self-tracking.

AB - This paper offers first-steps guidance towards the development of a methodology that embodies theoretical proposals for a fourth-wave, 'entanglement' approach to HCI. We propose the removal of technologies and the documenting of their absence as a method. Removal disrupts habitual relationships with our everyday technologies, revealing otherwise hidden knowledges. Removal as a method exemplifies that "you don't know what you've got till it's gone". We apply removal to the case of menstrual cycle tracking in two ways: literally through two autoethnographies, and hypothetically through semi-structured interviews. We show how this method especially facilitates emotional, embodied and cultural knowledge of the lived experience of self-tracking and we unpack some opportunities, implications and limitations in its use. Finally, we present how this method might be adopted by others and propose cases in which removal as a method might be applicable to study of a wider range of technologies beyond self-tracking.

U2 - 10.1145/3357236.3395425

DO - 10.1145/3357236.3395425

M3 - Article in proceedings

SP - 1779

EP - 1791

BT - DIS '20: Proceedings of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference

PB - Association for Computing Machinery

ER -

ID: 85231559