ITU

Designing with Emerging Science: Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking

Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Standard

Designing with Emerging Science : Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking. / Jenkins, Tom; Boer, Laurens; Homewood, Sarah; Almeida, Teresa; Vallgårda, Anna.

32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, 2020.

Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jenkins, T, Boer, L, Homewood, S, Almeida, T & Vallgårda, A 2020, Designing with Emerging Science: Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking. in 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3441000.3441020

APA

Jenkins, T., Boer, L., Homewood, S., Almeida, T., & Vallgårda, A. (2020). Designing with Emerging Science: Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking. In 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3441000.3441020

Vancouver

Jenkins T, Boer L, Homewood S, Almeida T, Vallgårda A. Designing with Emerging Science: Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking. In 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery. 2020 https://doi.org/10.1145/3441000.3441020

Author

Jenkins, Tom ; Boer, Laurens ; Homewood, Sarah ; Almeida, Teresa ; Vallgårda, Anna. / Designing with Emerging Science : Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking. 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, 2020.

Bibtex

@inproceedings{861bac2dff734c06922af6599c7bf05d,
title = "Designing with Emerging Science: Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking",
abstract = "The emerging science of the “gut-brain axis” has been used as the basis for self-tracking technologies assuming that this connection can be used productively for better regulating mood, supporting digestive health, and avoiding disease. Taking this emerging science as a source of design inspiration, this paper presents a design research process to uncover opportunities for novel interaction design and generate alternative approaches to self-tracking. We explored how this emerging scientific knowledge might be experienced and used and what these design spaces might look like through designing a self-tracking probe and asking science communicators working with the gut-brain axis to live with that probe. Their reactions led to a set of exploratory interaction design briefs and a more refined research product that collectively articulate how design can engage with emerging science to inspire a new perspective on self-tracking practices—one of cultivation rather than control.",
author = "Tom Jenkins and Laurens Boer and Sarah Homewood and Teresa Almeida and Anna Vallg{\aa}rda",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1145/3441000.3441020",
language = "English",
booktitle = "32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",
address = "United States",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Designing with Emerging Science

T2 - Developing an Alternative Frame for Self-Tracking

AU - Jenkins, Tom

AU - Boer, Laurens

AU - Homewood, Sarah

AU - Almeida, Teresa

AU - Vallgårda, Anna

PY - 2020/12/2

Y1 - 2020/12/2

N2 - The emerging science of the “gut-brain axis” has been used as the basis for self-tracking technologies assuming that this connection can be used productively for better regulating mood, supporting digestive health, and avoiding disease. Taking this emerging science as a source of design inspiration, this paper presents a design research process to uncover opportunities for novel interaction design and generate alternative approaches to self-tracking. We explored how this emerging scientific knowledge might be experienced and used and what these design spaces might look like through designing a self-tracking probe and asking science communicators working with the gut-brain axis to live with that probe. Their reactions led to a set of exploratory interaction design briefs and a more refined research product that collectively articulate how design can engage with emerging science to inspire a new perspective on self-tracking practices—one of cultivation rather than control.

AB - The emerging science of the “gut-brain axis” has been used as the basis for self-tracking technologies assuming that this connection can be used productively for better regulating mood, supporting digestive health, and avoiding disease. Taking this emerging science as a source of design inspiration, this paper presents a design research process to uncover opportunities for novel interaction design and generate alternative approaches to self-tracking. We explored how this emerging scientific knowledge might be experienced and used and what these design spaces might look like through designing a self-tracking probe and asking science communicators working with the gut-brain axis to live with that probe. Their reactions led to a set of exploratory interaction design briefs and a more refined research product that collectively articulate how design can engage with emerging science to inspire a new perspective on self-tracking practices—one of cultivation rather than control.

U2 - 10.1145/3441000.3441020

DO - 10.1145/3441000.3441020

M3 - Article in proceedings

BT - 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction

PB - Association for Computing Machinery

ER -

ID: 85512630