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Committee as Witness: Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation

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Committee as Witness : Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation. / Douglas-Jones, Rachel.

In: The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, Vol. 39, No. 1, 26.03.2021, p. 55-71.

Research output: Journal Article or Conference Article in JournalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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@article{ceebaa479a3046439ca4c3a7ced31b6d,
title = "Committee as Witness: Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation",
abstract = "This article explores the ethics review committee as a contemporary witness to the conduct of biomedical research. Ethics committee work is an internationally growing form of deliberation and decision making, a technology of anticipation that grants researchers access to experimental spaces, research funds and publication venues. Drawing on ethnographic work with a range of ethics committees across the Asia-Pacific region, I explore the metaphorical extension of logics of seeing into bureaucratic forms of ethics review. My analysis untethers the witnessing voice from an individual {\textquoteleft}point of view{\textquoteright}, focusing on the attestive assemblage and its documen- tation. By exploring the committee as a form of collective attestation, I aim to show witnessing as a form of ethical work, for ethical ends.",
keywords = "attesting, bureaucracy, committee, ethics, vision, witnessing",
author = "Rachel Douglas-Jones",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "26",
doi = "10.3167/cja.2021.390105",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "55--71",
journal = "The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology",
issn = "0305-7674",
publisher = "Berghahn Books",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Committee as Witness

T2 - Ethics Review as a Technology of Collective Attestation

AU - Douglas-Jones, Rachel

PY - 2021/3/26

Y1 - 2021/3/26

N2 - This article explores the ethics review committee as a contemporary witness to the conduct of biomedical research. Ethics committee work is an internationally growing form of deliberation and decision making, a technology of anticipation that grants researchers access to experimental spaces, research funds and publication venues. Drawing on ethnographic work with a range of ethics committees across the Asia-Pacific region, I explore the metaphorical extension of logics of seeing into bureaucratic forms of ethics review. My analysis untethers the witnessing voice from an individual ‘point of view’, focusing on the attestive assemblage and its documen- tation. By exploring the committee as a form of collective attestation, I aim to show witnessing as a form of ethical work, for ethical ends.

AB - This article explores the ethics review committee as a contemporary witness to the conduct of biomedical research. Ethics committee work is an internationally growing form of deliberation and decision making, a technology of anticipation that grants researchers access to experimental spaces, research funds and publication venues. Drawing on ethnographic work with a range of ethics committees across the Asia-Pacific region, I explore the metaphorical extension of logics of seeing into bureaucratic forms of ethics review. My analysis untethers the witnessing voice from an individual ‘point of view’, focusing on the attestive assemblage and its documen- tation. By exploring the committee as a form of collective attestation, I aim to show witnessing as a form of ethical work, for ethical ends.

KW - attesting

KW - bureaucracy

KW - committee

KW - ethics

KW - vision

KW - witnessing

U2 - 10.3167/cja.2021.390105

DO - 10.3167/cja.2021.390105

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 55

EP - 71

JO - The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology

JF - The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology

SN - 0305-7674

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 85851811