Playful interactive mirroring to support bonding between parents and children with Down Syndrome

Stefan Manojlovic, Laurens Boer, Paula Sterkenburg

Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents the ongoing design research and preliminary results in the field of family-centered healthcare, in particular directed to families with children at the age of 0-2 years with Down Syndrome. A central concern of these families is parent-child bonding, as bonding is often disrupted due to a lack of feedback from infants. We designed for parent-child bonding following a multi-stakeholder inquiry, in our case a family, a developmental and child psychologist, a physiotherapist specialized in child-care, and a family therapist. Based on an inquiry we argue that parent-child bonding can be supported through playful interactive mirroring. We designed a prototype to promote mirroring through multimodal stimuli, such as light and sound. As a first evaluated prototype resulted in enthusiasm and a sense of pride for the parents, we propose further explorations on the notion of playful interactive mirroring and future studies with the designed platform.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIDC '16 Proceedings of the The 15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Number of pages6
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Publication date2016
Pages548-553
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-4313-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventThe 15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children - The Lowry, Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 21 Jun 201624 Jun 2016
Conference number: 15
http://www.idc2016.org/

Conference

ConferenceThe 15th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
Number15
LocationThe Lowry
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period21/06/201624/06/2016
Internet address

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