“Looking for an Amazing Game I Can Relax and Sink Hours into..”: A Study of Relevance Aspects in Video Game Discovery

Toine Bogers, Maria Gäde, Marijn Koolen, Vivien Petras, Mette Skov

    Research output: Conference Article in Proceeding or Book/Report chapterArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    With the rapid growth of the video game industry over the past decade, there has been a commensurate increase in research activity focused on a variety of aspects of video games. How people discover the video games they want to play and how they articulate these information needs is still largely unknown, however. A better understanding of video game-related information needs and what makes a game relevant to a user could aid in the design of more effective, domain-specific search engines. In this paper we take a first step towards such domain-specific understanding. We present an analysis of a random sample of 521 complex game requests posted on Reddit. A coding scheme was developed that captures the 41 different aspects of relevance and information needs expressed in these requests. We find that game requests contain an average of close to 5 different relevance aspects. Several of these relevance aspects are geared specifically to video games, while others are more general.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationInformation in Contemporary Society
    EditorsNatalie Greene Taylor, Caitlin Christian-Lamb, Michelle H. Martin, Bonnie Nardi
    Number of pages13
    Place of PublicationGermany
    PublisherSpringer VS
    Publication date2019
    Pages503-515
    ISBN (Print)978-3-030-15741-8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019
    SeriesLecture Notes in Computer Science

    Keywords

    • Complex search
    • Game search
    • Information need categorization
    • Query analysis
    • Relevance aspects
    • Video games

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